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2 edition of ECOLOGICAL TRAITS PREDICTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN CENTRAL AMERICA found in the catalog.

ECOLOGICAL TRAITS PREDICTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN CENTRAL AMERICA

K. R. LIPS

ECOLOGICAL TRAITS PREDICTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN CENTRAL AMERICA

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Published .
Written in English


Edition Notes

Online version of print publicationCONSERVATION BIOLOGYv1742003, pp1078-1088

ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL19692450M

Lips KR, Reeve JD, Witters L. Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. ; Conserv. Biol. 17(4): – View ArticleCited by: 3. Introduction. A third of all amphibian species are under threat of extinction and more than two hundred are specifically under threats because of enigmatic diseases and threats [1, 2].Evidence points to the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), as one of the major causes for population declines and extinction events [1–3].However, Bd distribution is patchy, and its prevalence Cited by:


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ECOLOGICAL TRAITS PREDICTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN CENTRAL AMERICA by K. R. LIPS Download PDF EPUB FB2

Our results provide a predictive model with which to assess potential causes of population declines in other areas, and we generated a list of 52 species predicted to decline at a currently unaffected site in central by: Our results provide a predictive model with ECOLOGICAL TRAITS PREDICTING AMPHIBIAN POPULATION DECLINES IN CENTRAL AMERICA book to assess potential causes of population declines in other areas, and we generated a list of 52 species predicted to decline at a currently.

Ecological Traits Predicting Amphibian Population Declines in Central America KAREN R. LIPS,* JOHN D. REEVE, AND LANI R. WITTERS Department of Zoology, Southern Illinois University, Carbondale, ILU.S.A. Abstract: Amphibian populations are declining on all continents on which they occur, but not all species have been affected equally.

Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. Ecological Traits Predicting Amphibian Population Declines in Central America Populations of some species are extirpated, others have declined but survive, some have not obviously declined, and some are increasing.

Title: Ecological Traits Predicting Amphibian Population Declines in Central America Created Date: Z. Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. Conserv. Biol. 17, – | Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America.

Crossref | GoogleScholar Google Scholar |Cited by: The decline in amphibian populations is an ongoing mass extinction of amphibian species worldwide. Since the s, decreases in amphibian populations, including population crashes and mass localized extinctions, have been observed in locations all over the declines are known as one of the most critical threats to global biodiversity, and several causes are believed to be involved.

Central America hosts a diverse, unique, and imperiled amphibian fauna, and for decades Central America been a major epicenter of research into amphibian decline and conservation.

The effects of amphibian population declines on the structure and function of Neotropical stream ecosystems February Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment 4(1) Download PDF: Sorry, we are unable to provide the full text but you may find it at the following location(s): ersitylibrary (external link)Cited by: Over amphibian species are thought to have become extinct in recent decades, and at least 43% of all described species are currently experiencing population declines.

Thus, amphibian species represent an especially sensitive bellwether to habitat and climate change –.Cited by:   The degree to which amphibian species are associated with water was identified as the strongest predictor of which species were undergoing population declines in Central America (Lips et al.

In one Costa Rican highland forest, population crashes affecting nearly half of frog and toad species were attributed to cloud banks receding upward Cited by: A U.S. National Research Council Workshop in followed with the first systematic examination of amphibian population declines (Barinaga, ; Wake, ).

Participants agreed that there was empirical support for amphibian declines, but there was no consensus regarding a cause; in fact, it was suspected that several causes could be by: Measuring the Meltdown: Drivers of Global Amphibian Extinction and Decline Article (PDF Available) in PLoS ONE 3(2):e February with 1, Reads How we measure 'reads'.

Ecological traits of declining amphibians in upland areas of eastern Australia. Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. Global warming and extinctions of endemic species from biodiversity hotspots. Gridded Population of the world, version 2.

Ecological correlates and potential functions of kin recognition and kin association in anuran larvae. Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. Conserv Biol – (). Ecophysiology meets conservation: understanding the role of disease in amphibian population declines.

().Cited by:   The global pandemic caused by the amphibian fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has decimated frog populations around the world. This decline has been called out as a potential catastrophe for amphibian species.

What has been less explored are the impacts of amphibian declines on other members of their ecological communities. Using survey data collected over 13 Author: Elise F. Zipkin, Graziella V. DiRenzo, Graziella V. DiRenzo, Julie M. Ray, Sam Rossman, Sam Rossman.

Chytridiomycosis, an emerging infectious disease (EID) of the skin caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, has been linked with continuing amphibian population declines in the western USA, Central America, Europe, Africa, and c analysis suggests that B.

dendrobatidis is a recently emerged pathogen. This article reviews the biology of this pathogenic Cited by:   Hero JM, Williams SE, Magnusson WE () Ecological traits of declining amphibians in upland areas of eastern Australia.

Journal of Zoology (London), –   Emerging infectious diseases present a great challenge for the health of both humans and wildlife. Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. Conserv Biol. ; – Cited by: Lips KR, Reeve JD, Witters LR () Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America.

Conserv Biol – View Article Google Scholar Hero J.-M, Williams SE, Magnusson WE () Ecological traits of declining amphibians in upland.

Our analyses of both enigmatic RD (comparison B) and Bd infected species (comparison C) strongly support regional work on biological traits associated with amphibian population declines in Central America and Australia (Daszak et al.

; Hero et al. ; Lips et al. ; Murray and Hose ; Williams and Hero ): high altitude, small Cited by:   Global amphibian population declines. trends of the s were significantly negative only in North America and in Central and South America Landscape and Ecological Engineering ()Cited by: Behavioral traits are likely to influence species vulnerability to anthropogenic threats and in consequence, their risk of extinction.

Ecological Traits Predicting Amphibian Population Declines in Central America. Conserv Biol – Gotelli NJ, Graves GR Cited by: 5.

Population declines and priorities for amphibian conservation in Latin America. Conservation Biology Literature citations edited by John Wilkinson (johnjwilkinson at hotmail), VII.

Recent Scientific Publications. AmphibiaWeb maintains a list of recent scientific publications on amphibian declines and amphibian. Roughly 40% of amphibian species are in decline with habitat loss, disease, and climate change being the most cited threats.

Heterogeneity of extrinsic (e.g. climate) and intrinsic (e.g. local adaptations) factors across a species’ range should influence population response to climate change and other by: 7. Decline of a tropical montane amphibian fauna.

Does conservation planning matter in a dynamic and uncertain world. Ecological traits of declining amphibians in upland areas of eastern Australia.

Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. It remains unknown whether chytridiomycosis contributed to widespread amphibian declines reported in North America and Europe in the s to s (3, Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central by:   Lips KR, Reeve JD, Witters LR () Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America.

Conservation Biology CrossRef Google Scholar Liu X, Rohr JR, Li Y () Climate, vegetation, introduced host Cited by: (). Chytridiomycosis causes amphibian mortality associated with population declines in the rain forests of Australia and Central America. Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America.

The risk of extinction due to these factors is, to some degree, shaped by their ecological and morphological traits. The influence of traits like body size, clutch and range size or several environmental variables, like variations in precipitation and temperature, has been analysed in several studies (Cooper et al.

; Sodhi et by: 5. Pathogenic fungi have substantial effects on global biodiversity, and 2 emerging pathogenic species—the chytridiomycete Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, which causes chytridiomycosis in amphibians, and the ascomycete Geomyces destructans, which causes white-nose syndrome in hibernating bats—are implicated in the widespread decline of their vertebrate hosts.

Rapid spread of disease is a hazard in our interconnected world. The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis was identified in amphibian populations about 20 years ago and has caused death and species extinction at a global scale.

Scheele et al. found that the fungus has caused declines in amphibian populations everywhere except at its origin in Asia (see the Perspective by Cited by:   The coupling of environmental changes and disease outbreaks in amphibians in North America and in the tropics is emblematic of the complexity and dynamics of the ecological processes influencing amphibian population declines worldwide (Blaustein and Dobson ).

It is clear that organisms may not be able to adjust to such dynamics effectively Cited by: Lips KR, Reeve JD, Witters LR () Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America.

Conserv Biol –KR LipsJD ReeveLR WittersEcological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central v Biol. The degree to which amphibian species are associated with water was identified as the strongest predictor of which species were undergoing population declines in Central America (Lips et al.

In one Costa Rican highland forest, population crashes affecting nearly half of frog and toad species were attributed to cloud banks receding upward Cited by:   Innate immune defenses of amphibian skin: antimicrobial peptides and more.

Woodhams 1, L. Rollins-Smith 2, R. Alford 3, Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America. ''Ecological traits predicting amphibian population declines in Central America.'' Conservation Biology, 17(4), Livezey, R.L.

''The eggs and tadpoles of Bufo coniferus Cope in Costa Rica.'' Revista de Biologia Tropical, 34(2), Porter, K.R. ''Mating calls of six Mexican and Central American toads (genus Bufo).''. Assessing extinction risks in declining species is not new (e.g., Pimm et al. ; Purvis et al. ), but combining practices across the fields of ecology and epidemiology through data collected at decadal time scales could reveal ecological traits and ecosystem changes that place species at risk of undergoing population declines, and thus Cited by:.

The chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis has been implicated as the causative agent of mass mortalities, population declines, and the extinctions of stream‐breeding amphibian species worldwide.

While the factors that limit the distribution and abundance of B. dendrobatidis across large geographical regions are fairly well understood, little is known about the distribution of the Cited by:   Chytridiomycosis, the disease caused by the chytrid fungus, Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has contributed to amphibian population declines and extinctions worldwide.

The impact of this pathogen, however, varies markedly among amphibian species and populations. Following invasion into some areas of California's Sierra Nevada, Bd leads to rapid declines and local Cited by: Amphibian chytridiomycosis panzootic is ongoing and continuing to have extensive worldwide impact on amphibians.

Severity of chytridiomycosis-associated amphibians declines is partly associated with species’ altitudinal ranges. Michoacán state in México harbors 54 amphibian species on a wide range of climates, including high-altitude areas (above masl), suitable for Bd growth, such as.